QUinn Abstract March 12

Demographical Differences in Perceptions of Leadership Practices for Department Chairs and Job Satisfaction of Faculty Members at a Historically Black University

Edwin Quinn, Jr.

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TITLE: Demographical Differences in Perceptions of Leadership Practices for Department Chairs and Job Satisfaction of Faculty Members at a Historically Black University
 
RESEARCHER: Edwin Quinn, Jr.
College of Business and Information Technology
Argosy University, Atlanta Campus
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: March 2012

OBJECTIVE
To determine if there is a significant difference in the perception among faculty members for leadership practices of their department chairs and job satisfaction of faculty members based on gender and ethnic groups at a historically black university in the State of Mississippi.

METHODOLOGY
The target population was all 525 faculty listed in the Office of Institutional Research, regardless of discipline, from one historically black university in the State of Mississippi. All participants received an email with a link to a web based survey. The responding faculty consisted of 110 people, and of these, 54 were males and 44 were females (two did not identify their gender). The sample population was a good representation of the faculty population with 62% African Americans (69% in actual population) and 20% White (17% in actual population). Almost all of the respondents were full-time faculty members (97%). Participants completed the Leadership Practices Inventory-Observer in relation to their department chairs (71 men and 29 women), and the Job Satisfaction Inventory (Spector, 1997).

KEY FINDINGS
No statistically significant relationships were found in the perception between female and male faculty members for their department chairs’ predominant leadership practice. The rank order of engagement, however, was not the same for both genders. Female department chairs were viewed as engaging most frequently in Encouraging, followed by Challenge, Inspire, Model, and Enable. Male department chairs were viewed as engaging most frequently in Challenge, followed by Inspire, Encourage, Model and Enable.

When comparing the following ethnic groups: African American and Asian, African American and Whites, and Whites and Asians, the results indicated there was a statistically significant difference in the perception among ethnic groups of faculty members for their department chairs’ predominant leadership practice. The leadership practices of Modeling, Challenging, Enabling and Encouraging were all found to be statistically significant with Inspiring being the only one not statistically significant.


 

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