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Examining the Relationships of Perceptions of Leadership Behaviors, Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction of University and College Counseling Center Directors: Implications for Strengthening Leadership Training

Melaine L. Davenport

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TITLE: Examining the Relationships of Perceptions of Leadership Behaviors, Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction of University and College Counseling Center Directors: Implications for Strengthening Leadership Training
 
RESEARCHER: Melaine L. Davenport
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: November 2011

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this research was to examine any relationships between leadership behaviors, self-efficacy and job satisfaction perceptions of University and College Counseling Center Directors.

METHODOLOGY
Survey data was collected using a sample population of Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) members. Participants were asked to complete the Leadership Practice Inventory, Counselor Self-Efficacy Scale (Johnson, Baker, Koala, Kiselica and Thompson, 1989) and the Job Satisfaction Survey (Spector, 1985). One hundred and fifty-seven participated (32% response rate). The typical respondents were 52 years of age, female (67%), Caucasian (78%), holding a doctoral degree (77%), working in public four-year institutions (53%), and in their current position for 8+ years. Internal reliability coefficients for each leadership in this study were above 0.75.

KEY FINDINGS
The most frequently practiced leadership behavior was Enable, followed by Model, Encourage, Inspire, and Challenge. “The statistical results of the data collected in this study reflected that there was no significant difference in perceived leadership behavior, self-efficacy and job satisfaction of university and college counseling center directors. However, the statistical results of the data collected in this study reflected that there were significant differences in the subscales for leadership practices and job satisfaction” (p. 102). The author speculates that this finding may be “that counseling professionals are trained as clinical counselors instead of organizational managers. Therefore, directors may be satisfied with their jobs because they enjoy helping people which is the nature of their work, not necessarily because they practice leadership behaviors” (p. 112).


 

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