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Leadership Practices of Nurse Managers in Nurse Practice Environment and the Impact on Job Satisfaction of Registered Nurses

Kwamme A. Anderson

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TITLE: Leadership Practices of Nurse Managers in Nurse Practice Environment and the Impact on Job Satisfaction of Registered Nurses
 
RESEARCHER: Kwamme A. Anderson
School of Education
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: March 2011

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to describe the impact leadership practices of the nurse manager and the nurse practice environment have on job satisfaction of registered nurses in two urban teaching hospitals.

METHODOLOGY
Registered nurses employed in two urban teaching hospitals (northeast United States) comprised the study’s population, consisting of six nurse managers and their subordinate registered nurses (N=150). A total of 91 nurses participated (58% response rate. In addition to completing the Leadership Practices Inventory, respondents completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (Lake, 2007), PES-NWI), and the abridged Job In General (Ironson, Smith, Brannick, Gibson & Paul, 1989). The typical RN was 46 years of age or older (67%), held a bachelor's degree (57%), with more than 20 years of nursing experience (48%).

KEY FINDINGS
Transformational leadership (composite of all five leadership practices) explained 22.5 percent of the variance in the job satisfaction of nurses. No significant differences were found between the perceptions of nurse managers and their constituents (RNs) on any of the five leadership practices. There was a statistically strong correlation between nurse leadership practices and job satisfaction of registered nurses.

The author summarizes:
Findings from this study reconfirmed previous empirical studies that suggest nurse managers who employ transformational leadership behaviors and elicit collaborative effort experience job satisfaction of nursing unit team members who are retained and stay where they are (Cullen, 1998; McNeese-Smith, 1996; Sofarell & Brown, 1998; Welford, 2002). The results of this study support the hypothesis that nurse managers with exemplary leadership practices will have greater impact on job satisfaction of their subordinate registered nurse staff. Findings revealed a statistically strong positive correlation between nurse manager leadership practices and job satisfaction of registered nurses. Additionally, the results of this study show nurse manager's strong, transformative leadership practices explained 22.5% of the variance in job satisfaction of subordinate registered nurse staff (p. 79).


 

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