Abstract Smith - Chief Student Affairs Officers

Chief Student Affairs Officers: Effectiveness, Characteristics and Traits in Four-Tear, Post-Secondary Institutions

Download a Printer Friendly Version (PDF)
 
TITLE Chief Student Affairs Officers: Effectiveness, Characteristics and Traits in Four-Tear, Post-Secondary Institutions
 
RESEARCHER Bryan L. Smith
Department of Counseling and Student Affairs
Western Kentucky University (Bowling Green)
Thesis: June 2005

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to develop and describe traits and characteristics of an effective chief student affairs officer (CSAO).

METHODOLOGY
Research participants consisted of CSAOs from 29 nationally recognized public, Research University 1 colleges within the southern United States. Twenty-one returned the LPI and provided demographic data (response rate = 72%).

KEY FINDINGS
The LPI scores from the CSAOs were significantly higher than the Kouzes Posner normative data base for Challenge, Inspire and Encourage. The highest frequency for CSAOs was Challenge, followed by Enable, Encourage, Model and Inspire. There were no significant differences between male and female CSAOs scores on the five practices, nor did geographical location have any significant impact.

Regression analysis found some relationship between years of service both within a current job and years of experience in the student affairs profession having an impact on the leadership practices. Enabling Others to Act was significantly correlated with years in current job and Challenge the Process was significantly correlated with years in student affairs.

RELATED RESOURCES

We use cookies to ensure that we provide you with the best user experience. By accessing our website, you consent to our Cookie Policy. Read more about our Cookie Policy. Additional information can also be found in our Privacy Policy.