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Correlational Study Investigating the Relationship between Leadership Behavior and Employee Satisfaction in a PH Organization

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TITLE Correlational Study Investigating the Relationship between Leadership Behavior and Employee Satisfaction in a PH Organization
 
RESEARCHER Linzie Noel Clark Klein
School of Advanced Studies
University of Phoenix
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: October 2015

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify if a relationship existed between specific leadership behavior(s), employee satisfaction, and employee intent to leave in a public health (PH) service organization.

METHODOLOGY
The target population were all personnel employed at the Arizona Department of Health Services (N=800), of which 13 employees (or about 1.6%) completed the survey. Nine respondents (69.2%) were women, and nearly all (N=12) had at least an Associate’s degree. Respondents completed the LPI-Observer, along with a question about their level of job satisfaction and intention to stay with the organization.

KEY FINDINGS
While the average scores on each of the five leadership practice scales were higher for those employees who were satisfied as opposed to those who were dissatisfied, the results were not statistically significant. The author postulates: “If the sample size were larger, it is likely that there may have been statistical differences and suggestions of a relationship” (p. 77). Similar findings as these were found between the five leadership practices and the intention to leave question.

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