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Examining Transformational Leadership Components as Predictors of Job Satisfaction and Job Retention among Millennials Working in Veterinary Hospitals: A Methodological Study

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TITLE Examining Transformational Leadership Components as Predictors of Job Satisfaction and Job Retention among Millennials Working in Veterinary Hospitals: A Methodological Study
 
RESEARCHER Linda Kay Wayerski
School of Business
Northcentral University (Arizona)
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: November 2018

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to determine if any or all the five practices of transformational leadership predict job satisfaction and job retention among millennial veterinary technicians (VTs) who work in a veterinary hospital.

METHODOLOGY
The general population for this study was millennials (individuals January 1, 1978-December 31st, 1999.) who work as VTs in veterinary practice and participants were recruited from a professional organization website. Participants (N=196) completed the LPI-Observer, the MOAQ job satisfaction scale (Seashore et al. 1982), and a job retention scale (Johnsrud and Rosser 1999). The typical respondent was female (95%), Caucasian (91%), and held at least an associate’s degree (97%). Internal reliability for the LPI-O in this study was .85 Model, .921 Inspire, .90 Challenge, .91 Enable, and .89 Encourage.

KEY FINDINGS
Simple regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between each of the five leadership practices and both job satisfaction and job retention. Multiple regression analysis with all five leadership practices showed significant relationships with both job satisfaction and job retention. The leadership practice of Inspire a Shared Vision was most important in terms of job satisfaction and job retention.

The author concludes:

There were several conclusions from the study. All five practices appear to be individually related to VTs perceptions of job satisfaction and job retention. However, another conclusion is that the combined contributions of these practices cannot be conceived as a linear model. Only two of the practices appear to significantly contribute to job satisfaction and job retention when all were used together. If it is accepted that these five practices capture transformational leadership from a millennials viewpoint, then it can be concluded that a more complex model is needed to understand why and how each of the five practices is relevant to millennials. A conclusion is that none of the five practices can be dismissed as irrelevant for millennials, but also it is possible that millennial VTs would thrive with a particular balance of the five practices used by their leaders. If these practices are to be considered together as an approach to lead millennials, then a conclusion may be that inspire a shared vision and encourage the heart should be those that are emphasized as a starting point for the leadership of VTs (pp. 173-174).

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