Abstract Bertin Measuring Leadership Practices of Independent School Heads Using the LPI Self-Report

Measuring Leadership Practices of Independent School Heads Using the LPI Self-Report

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TITLE Measuring Leadership Practices of Independent School Heads Using the LPI Self-Report
 
RESEARCHER Randy R. Bertin
Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine University
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: December 2015

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this research was to identify the self-perceived leadership practices of heads of schools in California independent Schools as determined the extent of endorsement of the five leadership practices by the Leadership Practice Inventory.

METHODOLOGY
All 219 member heads of schools of California Association of Independent Schools (CAIS) were invited to participate and 35 did (16% response rate). Respondents indicated how frequently each of the five practices applied in their school. For this study, the Cronbach’s alphas were .60 for Model, .69 for Inspire, .75 for Challenge, .50 for Enable, and .80 for Encourage.

KEY FINDINGS
The most leadership practice most frequently applied was Enable, followed by Model, and then Inspire and Encourage, and Challenge. Three leadership practices (Model, Challenge, and Encourage) were significantly lower than a comparison group of public school principals (Hammack, 2010), and did not significantly vary for Inspire and Enable.

Measuring Leadership Practices of Independent School Heads Using the LPI Self-Report

Download a Printer Friendly Version (PDF)
 
TITLE Measuring Leadership Practices of Independent School Heads Using the LPI Self-Report
 
RESEARCHER Randy R. Bertin
Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine University
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: December 2015

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to identify the leadership practices of heads of school in California independent schools as determined by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI).

METHODOLOGY
The targeted respondents were the 219 current heads of schools in California who were employed at institutions currently members of California Association of Independent Schools, with 33 participating in the study (16% response rate). Respondents completed the LPI and the internal reliability coefficients (Cronbach alpha’s) in this study were .60 Model, .69 Inspire, .75 Challenge, .50 Enable, and .80 Encourage.

KEY FINDINGS
Enable was the leadership practice most frequently reported being used by heads of schools, followed by Model, and then Inspire, Encourage, and Challenge. Comparisons of the average LPI scores of heads of schools with California public school principals as reported by Hammack (2010) revealed significant differences for Model, Challenge, and Encourage, with scores from heads of school being lower than those of public school principals.

The author notes:

One important value of this study is in showing that, although heads of school for independent schools and public school principals do not share the same training requirements or course of progression through their careers, according to the LPI measures, they have a very similar approach to school leadership (i.e., without statistically significant difference) in two areas: inspire a shared vision and enable others to act (p. 101).

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