Abstract A Comparative Study of Leadership Practices between National Board Certified English Teachers and Non-Certified

A Comparative Study of Leadership Practices between National Board Certified English Teachers and Non-Certified

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TITLE A Comparative Study of Leadership Practices between National Board Certified English Teachers and Non-Certified
 
RESEARCHER Amy Wade Krum
College of Doctoral Studies
Grand Canyon University (Phoenix)
Unpublished doctoral dissertation: December 2018

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between North Carolina public National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certified and non-NBPTS certified high school English teachers’ self-rated leadership practices.

METHODOLOGY
North Carolina public high school English teachers were contacted about participating and of the 200 who received surveys, 109 were returned, with 61 of these from NBPTS certifications and 48 without certification. The typical respondent was female (88%). Internal reliability coefficients in this study for the LPI with NBPTS respondents was .88 Model, .87 Inspire, .87 Challenge, .90 Enable, and .88 Encourage and for non-NBPTS respondents was .72 Model, .81 Inspire, .77 Challenge, .89 Enable, and .86 Encourage.

KEY FINDINGS
NBPTS-certified teachers reported significantly more frequent scores on all five leadership practices compared with non-NBPTS certified teachers.

The author recommends:

The results of the study could be of significance to creating a model for secondary English teacher training programs as well as professional development within high schools. An administrator or curriculum specialist could administer the LPI-self form to the English teachers on-site and personalize professional development. The LPI-self can also be used as a source of reflection for yearly professional development plans. The findings of this study could also significantly impact secondary English education programs as well as lateral entry and Teach for America programs, for those who enter the field a less traditional way by identifying the leadership practices of public high school English teachers (Barnes, et al., 2016; Blumenreich & Rogers, 2016). A prospective or beginning teacher could use the LPI-self to identify those practices most important to leading in the public high school English classroom. This tool could be used for self-reflection and growth in the field (pp. 126-127).

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